Category Archives: art

America Today mural at the MET

THB America Today

Today I was surprised and excited to see Thomas Hart Benton’s America Today mural at the MET. When I worked in midtown I would stop by Axa’s lobby on 6th ave during my lunch break to admire the mural. So cool to see it as it was originally intended. I can just imagine sitting in a conference room discussing some trivial issue surrounded by Benton’s work. Check it out.

Skye Gilkerson at Transmitter

TRANSMITTER PRESENTS: 6 x 6
JEFF FELD, ERIK SHANE SWANSON, LYNN SULLIVAN, JOHN BOHL, SKYE GILKERSON, SANDRA ONO
FEBRUARY 20 – MARCH 28, 2015
OPENING RECEPTION FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 20, 6 – 9 PM

Fingers crossed that I can make it out for this show – love Skye Gilkerson’s work!

SGlkrson1

Skye Gilkerson
Wounded in West Texas
unfolded page of the New York Times with punctuation removed, ink

Each drawing is made of an unfolded page from the New York Times, with every punctuation mark removed. The remaining paper is saturated with its own medium: black ink, leaving a cosmos of blank spaces. Each piece represents one month of the past year; the titles are drawn from the unseen text of each page, zooming into specific content from that day, ranging from individual tragedies and victories to world wide events.

Library of Water | Roni Horn

RONI HORN
VATNASAFN / LIBRARY OF WATER
Stykkishólmur, Iceland
June – August (1PM-6PM)
Unfortunately the library was closed during our time in Stykkisholmur but I did manage to get a few shots from the exterior.

LibraryofWater1

LibraryofWater2

For the past 30 years, the work of Roni Horn has been intimately involved with the singular geography, geology, climate and culture of Iceland. Library of Water is a long term installation including three related collections of water, words, and weather reports. The installation is housed in a former library building in the coastal town of Stykkisholmur, Iceland.

Water, Selected is a constellation of 24 glass columns containing water collected from ice from some of the major glaciers around Iceland. The glass columns refract and reflect the light onto a rubber floor embedded with a field of words in Icelandic and English which relate to the weather – inside or outside. The sculpture installation offers a space for private reflection whilst accommodating a wide variety of community uses.

 

Last few days working downtown

I have loved being back downtown for my workdays. Midtown with Central Park and the Lincoln Center crowd was fun but downtown is where I started. I moved to New York City in the early months of 1998 and was working downtown within 8 hours of my arrival. Next to the U.S. Custom House and then up to WTC2. So last year when I started at Sapient Global Markets on Fulton Street I was all a flutter of being back to my early stomping grounds. Lower manhattan wasn’t the same but than neither was I. It was busier and I was more (or less) grown up. I will be leaving Sapient next week and in these last few days I will try to think about what I will miss about working downtown.

No 1: THE COMMUTE
FerryRide
The East River Ferry was very good to me. Early monthly passes proclaimed it as “The Civilized Commute” and I very much agreed. The best start to my day was coffee on the tidal strait. Somehow I don’t think the G to the L to the N will be nearly as meditative.

 

No 2: HIDDEN GEMS
Why I will miss working downtownThere is history all around. Sometimes hidden or obscured but still there waiting to be noticed. After you visit Trinity Church, Century21, or experience the memorial take a walk down a narrow street towards the water. Down John Street you might find one of my lunch spots sandwiched between two buildings. The slice of a courtyard features this replica of Joseph Beekman Smith’s View of John Street, 1768, (completed in the early 1990’s). The original, painted in 1768, is on display in the John Street United Methodist Church.

No 3: POWER CORNER
Edison
I always thought it was pretty cool that I worked on the exact spot where Edison built the first central power plant (Pearl Street Power Plant), formed the Edison Illuminating Company (financed by J.P. Morgan and the Vanderbilt family), and delivered electricity to homes and businesses across the city. Still makes me tingly all over.

No 4: THE FED
The FED
What can I say, I like the building! I really like it. Why? Well it looks like a neatly stacked pile of sofa cushions. I can’t not touch this building and so I always do. It’s strange because the architects, York and Sawyer, sought structural expressions of strength, stability and security. They intended to inspire public confidence in the Federal Reserve System through the architecture. It still looks like pillows to me. Also, I think its cool that 80 feet below street level is the largest gold repository in the world. Don’t get a bunion walking above the bullion.

No 5: PUBLIC ART
Dubuffet
I have a soft spot for the public art downtown. From the late 1960’s we have Jean DuBuffet’s Four Tress and Noguchi’s Red Cube. Looking for something more recent? Walk over to 7WTC for Jenny Holzer and Jeff Koons.