Category Archives: museum

America Today mural at the MET

THB America Today

Today I was surprised and excited to see Thomas Hart Benton’s America Today mural at the MET. When I worked in midtown I would stop by Axa’s lobby on 6th ave during my lunch break to admire the mural. So cool to see it as it was originally intended. I can just imagine sitting in a conference room discussing some trivial issue surrounded by Benton’s work. Check it out.

Let Mike Kelley blow your mind

GO SEE THIS SHOW

Mike Kelley at MoMA PS1 will blow your mind. I was in awe of the amount of work (over 200 pieces), his dexterity in mediums, and just how cohesive it all was. His work involves found objects, textiles, drawings, assemblage, collage, performance, sound art, video and stuffed animals.

A standout for me was his mesmerizing “paintings” that use a Canadian folk art form, “memory ware”. Memory ware is a common object, such as a bottle or ashtray that has been decorated with attractive, inexpensive, items like buttons, beads, shells, costume jewelry and “keepsakes”. The act of looking- searching to find valuable gems or mere trinkets reminded me of my thrift store shopping. The patterns of the pieces had their own rhythm that I found comforting. Lastly, the obsession element was interesting.

- Memory Ware flat 49, 2001

Memory Ware flat 49, 2001

The recent MoMA acquisition of “Deodorized Central Mass with Satellites” was on view. The stuffed-animal installation is a giant colorful hanging mobile. Surrounding the hanging “balls” are resin sculptures in geometric shapes, which have air fresheners that spray periodically.

Deodorized Central Mass with Satellites, 1991-1999 (photo by Robert Lanham)

Deodorized Central Mass with Satellites, 1991-1999 (photo by Robert Lanham)

Deodorized Central Mass with Satellites, 1991-1999

Deodorized Central Mass with Satellites, 1991-1999

Deodorized Central Mass with Satellites, 1991-1999

Deodorized Central Mass with Satellites, 1991-1999

Another collection I enjoyed was the Kandor Project. It is a series of sculptures, lightboxes, and videos related to the fictional city of Kandor, the capitol of Superman’s home planet Krypton. According to DC Comics, the city was stolen and miniaturized by the supervillain Brainiac and eventually recovered by Superman, who kept it in a bottle in the Fortress of Solitude.

me in front of a Kandor series work, 2011

me in front of a Kandor series work, 2011

Dan Flavin Art Institute

DIA Art Foundation
Dan Flavin Art Institute
Corwith Avenue, off Main Street
Bridgehampton, New York

Established in 1983 as a permanent installation of Flavin’s work, this renovated firehouse holds a permanent installation of nine works in fluorescent light created by the artist between 1963 and 1981, and a gallery for changing exhibitions. It is well worth a visit and makes a perfect end of summer day trip from new york city.

more info

Dan Flavin, “untitled” (1976)
“untitled” (1976)

Dan Flavin, detail
Detail of “untitled (to Jan and Ron Greenberg)” (1972–73)

Dan Flavin, “red out of a corner (to Annina)” (1963)
“red out of a corner (to Annina)” (1963)

Dan Flavin
LEFT: “untitled (to Jan and Ron Greenberg)” (1972–73)
RIGHT: “untitled (in honor of Harold Joachim) 3″ (1977)

Flavin, detail
Detail of “untitled (to Katharina and Christoph)” (1971)

Sol LeWitt: the Area between

I’ve slowly become a giant Sol LeWitt fan. It started when I saw his work on the MET rooftop and the City Hall Park installation. That led to a long weekend at MASS MoCA for his retrospective. Recently I ran into, “Photograph of Mid-Manhattan with the Area between The Plaza, Ansonia, Biltmore and Carlyle Hotels Removed” at MoMA. Swoon.

Sol LeWitt Manhattan by kateshanley
Sol LeWitt Manhattan, a photo by kateshanley on Flickr.

This is what my apartment felt like this morning

Olafur Eliasson by kateshanley
Olafur Eliasson, a photo by kateshanley on Flickr.

Olafur Eliasson: Your Waste of Time

Installation presents massive pieces of ice that broke off from Iceland’s largest glacier, Vatnajökull. The oldest ice in the glacier is estimated to have originated some 800 years ago, around AD 1200.

Presented as sculptures that visitors can walk around and contemplate, their continued presence is made possible by refrigerating the gallery space to maintain a temperature below freezing. The physical experience of centuries-old ice from the glaciers of Eliasson’s native Iceland makes tangible a history that extends beyond the human life span—time that is measured in thousands of years rather than mere decades.